• Who's Your Daddy?

    What the Flock – March-April 2017

    From page 27 Answer: Senegal thick-knee (Burhinus senegalensis) The Senegal thick-knee (Burhinus senegalensis) is a stone-curlew, a group of waders in the family Burhinidae. It is a resident breeder in Africa between the Sahara and the equator, and in the Nile valley. Senegal thick-knees are medium large waders with strong black and yellow black bills, large yellow eyes — which give them a reptilian appearance — and cryptic plumage. The scientific name refers to the prominent joints in the long yellow or greenish legs. They are similar but slightly smaller than the Eurasian stone-curlew, which winters in Africa. The long dark bill, single black bar on the folded wing, and…

  • Featured

    Dr. Cromwell Purchase – An Inspirational Leader

    [DR. CROMWELL PURCHASE AND TEAM ATALWABRA] What does it feel like to plan the future for an entire species? Last year, ROSEMARY LOW renewed her acquaintance with someone in just that position: Dr Cromwell Purchase, whose drastic conservation techniques include influencing the sex ratio of baby macaws in the egg. [SPIX’S MACAWS (CYANOPSITTA SPIXII) PHOTO CROMWELL PURCHASE] QUOTES AND NOTES 2016 In 2016 I was fortunate to attend several parrot symposia. It is always a privilege to hear Dr Cromwell Purchase speak as I did in North Carolina in April and at the Parrot Society of Australia meeting in Brisbane in July. At the latter he presented a fascinating topic.…

  • Features

    The Lutino Plum-headed Parakeet

    Fabulous photos by Steve Duncan [PLUMHEADED PARAKEET (PSITTACULA CYANOCEPHALA) LUTINO MALE ] The Plum-headed Parakeet, Psittacula cyanocephala, is arguably the most beautiful of the smaller Asian parakeets. In comparison to other Psittacula, it is compact in size, but maintains its dignity because of its sleek physique, long elegant tail, and of course the customary psittacula demarcation above the neckline. Although the hen’s head remains a slate color, the cock’s handsomeness becomes obvious in maturity, becoming an exquisite purple-red color. Unlike other larger, boisterous, and audibly annoying Psittacula species, Plumheads in general are typically gentle, calm, and pleasantly quiet. When hand-fed, they can make wonderful pets and never seem to become…

  • 3 Photographs
    Biography,  Features

    A True Aviculturist

    Nestling in the Santa Clara River Valley Just Out of Filmore, California Is the Charming Home of Francis H. Rudkin With Its Wonderful Collection By Dr. Dave Silverstone, Los Angeles, Calif. WHILE rambling through the country one day last Fall, I saw a Military Macaw circling over the orange grove. This was, indeed, a surprise and as the bird descended to one of the trees I could not re­sist the temptation to follow. The virtual paradise that greeted my eyes well repaid my insatiable curiosity. Nestling in the Santa Clara River Valley just out of Filmore, Calif., is this home. The owner is sure an avid aviculturist is the thought…

  • Correspondence

    Correspondence

    In a letter from the Marquess of Tavistock he informs me that young Lovebirds will begin to take ordinary seedspray almost as readily and at an early an age as they will eat spray millet. He and seems surprised that spray millet is not sold in the pet shops in America. I herewith quote a part of his letter: “For some strange reason most of the smaller and delicate finches and parakeets are ex­traordinarily fond of it and appear unquestionably to derive more benefit from eating it than they do from eating, which is apparently the identical seed out of the seed head. Even the pioneers in aviculture were aware…

  • Articles,  Features

    Avicultural Notes

    The popularity of the Australian Shell Parrakeet (so­-called love-bird of the trade) is growing by leaps and bounds. Hardly a day passes we do not receive letters from all over the country asking for information about breeding them, size of cages, what kind of food required when nesting, kind of nest, and a dozen other questions. Why doesn’t some of our members write down their own experience and let others profit thereby. A bird that is becoming more and more frequently seen even in the smaller pet shops is the Bengalese or Society­finch. Large numcers of these have been brought over from Japan lately and this may account for its…

  • Membership

    Membership – 2017 May-June

    ASA Member Clubs Central California Avian Society PO Box 5067 Fresno, CA 93755 www.ccasbirds.com Contra Costa Avian Society P.O. Box 23115 Pleasant Hill, CA 94523 www.contracostaaviansociety.org Acadiana Bird Club 480 Almonaster Dr, Youngsville, LA 70592 acadianabirdinc@hotmail.com Arizona Seedcracker Society Inc P.O. Box 26899 Mesa, AZ 85214 Long Beach Bird Breeders 6444 Spring St # 132 Long Beach, CA 90815 longbeachbirdbreeders@gmail.com Orange County Bird Breeders www.ocbirdbreeders.org Fort Worth Bird Club P.O. Box 1712 Keller, TX 76244 fwbc@fortworthbirdclub.com Finch Society of San Diego County 4256 10 Ave San Diego, CA 92103 www.finchsocietyofsandiego.com   The Foreign Bird League The Premier Foreign Bird Keeping Society in the UK Founded 1932 Overseas membership for 2012 £1800…

  • Contents

    Contents – 2017 September-October

    Volume 85, Number 5 September/October 2017 The purposes of the Society are the study of foreign and native birds to promote their conservation and protection; the dissemination of information on the care, breeding, and feeding of birds in captivity; the education of Society members and the public through publications, meetings, and available media; and the promotion and support of programs and institutions devoted to conservation. (IMAGE: ASA Logo) Front Cover: Javan green magpie (Cissa thalassina) photo copyright Cikananga Conservation Breeding Centre. Inside front cover: Female eclectus, photo Dayle Jordan, Australia. © 2012-2017 Avicultural Society of America. All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced without express written…

  • Contents

    Contents – 2017 May-June

    Volume 85, Number 3 May/June 2017 (IMAGE: ASA Logo) The purposes of the Society are the study of foreign and native birds to promote their conservation and protection; the dissemination of information on the care, breeding, and feeding of birds in captivity; the education of Society members and the public through publications, meetings, and available media; and the promotion and support of programs and institutions devoted to conservation. Front Cover: Javan green magpie (Cissa thalassina) photo copyright Cikananga Conservation Breeding Centre. Inside front cover: Female eclectus, photo Dayle Jordan, Australia. © 2012-2017 Avicultural Society of America. All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced without express written…

  • Officers,  Staff

    Officers and Staff 2017 – May-June

    President Carol Stanley 925-698-0191 Vice-President Alex Culp alex@asabirds.org 714-308-0270 Secretary Kimberly Robertson krobertson@safariwest.com Treasurer Steve Duncan 909-599-7577 Board of Directors Roger Bringas rogerbringas@gmail.com Jennifer Culp 714-894-6146 Sheri Hanna turacoldy@aol.com 805-208-1759 Susie Kasielke skasielke@aol.com Rick Rosenthal rickatbnb@aol.com Dick Schroeder 760-743-3156 dick.schroeder.911@gmail.com Jack Wikoff 909-428-5756 Aviculture Apprentice Program Kimberly Robertson, Director krobertson@safariwest.com Carol Stanley 925-698-0191 Alycia Antheunisse acampidonica@gmail.com Board Advisor Genny Wall 949-859-0861 Communications Director Dick Schroeder 760-743-3156 dick.schroeder.911@gmail.com Web Master Steve Duncan 909-599-7577 www.asabirds.org Legislative Liaison Officer Laurella Desborough 904-291-9043 Membership Committee Alycia Antheunisse, Chair acampidonica@gmail.com 209-333-2185 Steve Duncan, Director 909-599-7577 Alex Culp alex.k.mullenex@gmail.com 714-308-0270 Jennifer Culp 714-894-6146 Rick Rosenthanl rickatbnb@aol.com Sheri Hanna turacoldy@aol.com 805-208-1759 Ways & Means Mary Rose mary@chirpingcentral.com 602-999-7828 Legislative…